TRX Chest Fly

TRX Chest FlyTRX Chest Fly

TRX Chest Flyes are a great exercise for the chest muscles. Like push ups, it is a superior exercise because anytime you are moving your body instead of moving an object in your hands, you are using more muscle and using more energy. For this reason, the TRX Chest Fly is superior to dumbbell chest flyes. For example, performing a dumbbell chest fly doesn’t use as much muscle because your torso is supported by a bench during the exercise. The reason TRX Chest Flyes are superior is because the handles of the TRX system also move freely. This requires even more muscles to activate in order to stabilize you. Although they require the TRX system, the equipment is light and portable so they can also be done anywhere.

Besides this exercise, you can see more at List of Exercises by Body Part. Remember, an exercise is only as good as the workout program it is part of. Make sure you check out Best Exercises Programs.

[hmtad name=”In Content” align=”left”]

Muscles Usedpec muscles

The primary mover is the pectoralis major, the front deltoids and the triceps muscles.

 

Description

  • While positioned on dip bars, start in the up, extended position.
  • Inhale as you slowly lower yourself to the lowest point that is still comfortable to your shoulders. (generally no lower than your upper arm being parallel to the floor.
  • Exhale as you return to the starting position.
  • Repeat until fatigued.

Alternative/Similar Exercises

 

  • Push Ups

 

Check out the List of Exercises by Body Part.

Mike Caton

 

Dips

dips exerciseDips

Dips are a very good chest exercise because it forces you to raise and lower your body weight rather than have your body supported while you move an object. That forces you to use more muscle than other exercises that don’t. It may be  argued that dips are the very best upper body exercise there is because of the amount of muscle that it uses.

Dips are an advanced, intense exercise. In fact, the typical adult probably couldn’t perform one correct dip exercise. It would be good for everyone to be able to do them, though.

Besides this exercise, you can see more at List of Exercises by Body Part. Remember, an exercise is only as good as the workout program it is part of. Make sure you check out Best Exercises Programs.

[hmtad name=”In Content” align=”left”]

Muscles Usedpec muscles

The primary mover is the pectoralis major, the front deltoids and the triceps muscles.

 

Description

  • While positioned on dip bars, start in the up, extended position.
  • Inhale as you slowly lower yourself to the lowest point that is still comfortable to your shoulders. (generally no lower than your upper arm being parallel to the floor.
  • Exhale as you return to the starting position.
  • Repeat until fatigued.

Alternative/Similar Exercises

Check out the List of Exercises by Body Part.

Mike Caton

 

Dumbbell Incline Chest Press

man performing a dumbbell incline chest pressDumbbell Incline Chest Press

The dumbbell incline chest press is a good chest exercise because is uses dumbbells and because of it’s angle. The dumbbells are harder to manage than a barbell or machine, so it forces you to work harder and use more muscle than the other chest presses. The change in angle places more emphasis on the upper pec muscles. Although the entire muscle is working, the fibers on the upper portion are forced to do more work.

Besides this exercise, you can see more at List of Exercises by Body Part. Remember, an exercise is only as good as the workout program it is part of. Make sure you check out Best Exercises Programs.

[hmtad name=”In Content” align=”left”]

Muscles Usedpec muscles

The primary mover is the pectoralis major, the front deltoids and the triceps muscles.

 

Description

  • Holding dumbbells, lie back on an incline bench
  • Start with your arms nearly fully extended. The dumbbells should be straight up from your shoulders toward the ceiling.
  • Inhale as you lower the weights to just outside your shoulders. Don’t go so low that your shoulders are strained.
  • Exhale as you push the weights back to the starting position.
  • Repeat until fatigued.

Alternative/Similar Exercises

Check out the List of Exercises by Body Part.

Mike Caton

 

Bench Press

Bench Press

I hate to say it, but I’m not a fan of the Bench Press exercise. But, it’s such a popular exercise, that I couldn’t ignore it. Here’s why I don’t like it:

  1. It supports your back because you have to lie down on a bench to perform it.  This is very non-functional. This is not the way you would perform a pushing motion in real life. Push ups and standing cable chest presses force you to push without back support.
  2. You don’t have to use our core as much. Since your back is supported, you don’t have to work your core muscles as mush.
  3. The bar doesn’t force you to use as many muscles as dumbbells and cables so.  Dumbbell Chest Presses and certainly TRX Chest Presses use much more muscles.

I really wish the Bench Press was not so tied into standard strength measurements of athletes like football players. Really, even football players never push opponents with something supporting their backs. So, why test them this way?

In addition to this exercise, you can see more at List of Exercises by Body Part. Remember, an exercise is only as good as the workout program it is part of. Make sure you check out Best Exercises Programs.

 

Description

  • Lie on a bench with your eyes directly under the bar
  • Grip the bar at a width that will maintain your hands directly above your shoulders as you lower the weight.
  • Inhale as you slowly lower the weights toward your chest
  • Lower the bar until your elbows are just lower than your shoulders
  • Exhale as you slowly raise the weights back to the starting postition
  • Repeat for the desired amount of repetitions or until fatigued

Check out the List of Exercises by Body Part.

Standing Cable Chest Press

Standing Cable Chest Press

The Standing Cable Chest Press is one of the very best upper body ans specifically chest exercises there is. The reason is because unlike the bench press or dumbbell chest press, our back is not against and supported by a bench. This means that you must use your core muscles to accomplish the exercise. Additionally, the standing cable chest press puts you in the position you would be in if you actually had to press. Think about it, when would you ever have the luxury of having your back supported as you press something?  Also, the free-moving cables mean that you will use more muscle to move them in the right direction. And, more muscle means more energy used, calories spent, and metabolism raised. It’s a great exercise!  In addition to this exercise, you can see more at List of Exercises by Body Part. Remember, an exercise is only as good as the workout program it is part of. Make sure you check out Best Exercises Programs.


Description

  • Have cables adjusted so that they are at shoulder height or just above
  • Hold handles at chest height
  • With elbows out, hands should be even with elbows
  • Exhale as you press out until elbows are almost fully extended
  • Inhale as you return to the starting position
  • Repeat for the desired amount of repetitions or until fatigued

Check out the List of Exercises by Body Part.